Young people not in education, employment or training (NEET), UK: November 2022

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main points

  • From July to September 2022, the number of young people aged 16 to 24 not in education, employment or training (NEET) increased, the total is currently estimated at 724,000, compared to 711,000 from April to June . 2022.
  • The percentage of all young people who were NEET from July to September 2022 was estimated at 10.6%, up 0.2 percentage points over the quarter (April to June 2022), but down 0.5 percentage points. percentage from pre-coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic levels (October to December 2019).
  • The increase in the number of young NEETs was entirely affected by women, who recorded an increase of 14,000 over the quarter (April to June 2022).
  • The number of NEET and economically inactive young people from July to September 2022 was estimated at 490,000, an increase of 17,000 over the quarter (from April to June 2022).
  • There were around 234,000 young people in the UK who were NEET and unemployed, a record high; of these, an estimated 218,000 are the record number of people between the ages of 18 and 24.

Total youth not in education, employment or training (NEET)

An estimated 10.6% of all people aged 16-24 in the UK were not in education, employment or training from July to September 2022. This represents an increase of 0.2 percentage point from the quarter and 0.2 percentage points from July to September 2021. , but down 0.5 percentage points from pre-coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic levels (October to December 2019). An estimated 11.0% of young men (down 0.1 percentage point over the quarter) and 10.2% of young women (up 0.4 percentage points over the quarter) were NEET. A total of 724,000 young people were NEET, an increase of 12,000 over a quarter driven entirely by women. Of the total number of young NEETs, 383,000 were men and 340,000 women.

The total number of people aged 18 to 24 who were NEET was 675,000, up 7,000 from the previous quarter.

The percentage of people aged 18 to 24 who were NEET was 12.6%, up 0.1 percentage point over the quarter.

Figure 1: The percentage of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) has slowly increased but is still below pre-coronavirus levels

People aged 16-24 NEET as a percentage of all young people by age, seasonally adjusted, UK, July-September 2012 to July-September 2022

Unemployed young people who were not in education, employment or training

There were around 234,000 unemployed young people aged 16 to 24 who were NEET from July to September 2022. This was a record low, down 5,000 from April to June 2022 and 37,000 from to July to September 2021. An estimated 155,000 of these unemployed NEETS were men, a record high, and 79,000 were women.

Economically inactive youth who were not in education, employment or training

From July to September 2022, approximately 490,000 economically inactive young people aged 16 to 24 were NEET. This represents an increase of 17,000 from the April-June 2022 quarter and of 52,000 from July-September 2021. The number of NEET and economically inactive young men was 228,000, and the number of young women was of 262,000.

Sub-national estimates not in education, employment or training (NEET) are not published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), but can be found by following the related links in section 8 of this bulletin.

Learn more here.


Industry response

Russell Hobby, CEO of Teach First said:

“The sad truth is that these 700,000 young people without jobs, education or training are much more likely to come from the poorest communities in the country. Indeed, if the talent is evenly distributed, the opportunities are not.

“If the government wants to generate growth, it needs to shift funding to schools serving disadvantaged communities – where it has the potential to make the biggest difference. In addition to helping more young people thrive in their future, it will provide us with the highly skilled workforce needed to build our country’s long-term prosperity.

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